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Radio Archives Newsletter
 
July 30, 2021
 
Four new products from Radio Archives this week!
All new Digital Download products are discounted 50% and the Audio CD versions are discounted 25% the first week.
 
Old Time Radio
 
 
The Great Gildersleeve not only had a long term impact on radio, then television situation comedies, but the character’s and show’s presence became quite well known while the show was on the air. Gildy’s laugh was mimicked and mocked by actors on various programs and his very likeness and voice showed up in several cartoons, even once up against Bugs Bunny. Other characters also inspired others to lift their likenesses and catch phrases to other mediums, including Judge Hooker, the Widow Ransom, and Leroy.
 
According to an article written in 1945, The Jolly Boys, Gildy’s group of singing friends’, originally just an idea for a single episode, not only caught on enough for the show to give the group a recurring role, but also translated into real groups in cities across the country. Although it’s hard to pinpoint where such groups did form, it seems largely a Southern phenomenon. In the article, it is mentioned that Hal Peary discovered a Jolly Boys group in Memphis. There’s also a Jolly Boys group apparently still active in Granada, Mississippi that began in 1945.
 
One likely unexpected aspect of The Great Gildersleeve’s popularity turned out to be the reaction of the real Gildersleeve family. Through the years, Peary, then Waterman received mail addressed to various Gildersleeves, such as bills, or from someone with the surname Gildersleeve, either complaining or praising the show. An article in 1943 about the show stated that the actual Gildersleeve family was made up of academics, attorneys, and clergymen, and had strong roots in American history. One family member even threatened to sue the show for defamation. Others, such as Clifford Gildersleeve, Cleveland, Ohio’s Chamber of Commerce President, enjoyed the show and bit of fame it brought to the family.
 
Discover why The Great Gildersleeve is not only considered a great comedy, but also one of the best shows of classic radio in this collection, The Great Gildersleeve, Volume 39, complete with Kraft Foods commercials and restored to sparkling digital quality.
 
 
6 hours - $11.99 MP3 / $23.98 Audio CDs
 
 
Audiobooks
The Seventh Column
by G. Wayman Jones
Read by Milton Bagby
 
 
Out of the night comes a menacing winged figure! Blind district attorney Tony Quinn takes his battle for justice from the courtrooms to the streets, battling evil as The Black Bat!
 
A boastful crook’s clever scheme boomerangs when mystery stalks a night club! The Black Bat, masked foe of the underworld, plays a grim game of life and death to save America from treachery when he pits himself against the slimy hirelings of the Axis!
 
Many fans and experts note that not only did The Black Bat borrow much from the heroes who came before, but he also influenced heroes in various mediums, both contemporary to him and in the future. Regardless, several aspects of The Black Bat made him stand out as a unique hero, one of the most notable of this being his costume, designed to live up to his chosen name and to hopefully frighten more than a few criminals into submission. Wearing a fully black skintight outfit with a full-face mask to match, The Black Bat took his crime fighting persona literally by adding a cape complete with ribbing to simulate the wings of a bat to his ensemble. Gloved and gauntleted, Tony Quinn completely conceals not only his identity but also his unique ability to see in the dark behind the frightening visage of The Black Bat. Using this along with his blazing guns and obviously well-trained fists, he delivers a crushing blow to crime in each story.
 
The Black Bat does not fight in total anonymity, however. Although his identity is a secret, the masked man wants to make sure that those he pursues know that he is fully responsible for his actions. To this end, he leaves a black bat shaped sticker on the bodies of those he kills or injures. This is a tactic used by other heroes before him and since and serves only one purpose-so the underworld knows that they have an enemy in The Black Bat!
 
Thrill to The Seventh Column originally published in Black Book Detective #55 January 1943 and read with two fisted excitement by award winning voice actor Milton Bagby.
 
5 hours - $9.99 MP3 / $19.98 Audio CDs
 
 
 
Audiobooks
Radio Archives Pulp Classics
Black Book Detective eBook
#55 January 1943
 
Total Pulp Experience. These exciting pulp adventures have been beautifully reformatted for easy reading as an eBook and features every story, every editorial, and every column of the original pulp magazine.
 
Black Book Detective magazine was probably best known for its long-running series of adventure stories featuring the crimefighter known as The Black Bat. But The Black Bat didn't appear until six years into the magazine's run with the July 1939 issue. The magazine first hit the newsstands with the June 1933 issue. For the next six years, it tried different approaches. Issue one began with a featured novel and several backup short stories. The following year it started promoting "three new complete novels" in each magazine, but abandoned that approach after four issues. It then tried shorter novelets, combined with short stories. In 1935 and 1936, it tried the "weird menace" approach, featuring scantily-clad women in peril on the covers, then switched back to hard crime. In 1938 they tried featuring recurring characters in their main novel. Gentleman thief Raffles appeared in two consecutive issues. Jonathan Drake, Ace Manhunter appeared in three issues.
 
The editors struck gold with The Black Bat, who first appeared in the July 1939 issue. Supposedly blind District Attorney Tony Quinn was secretly the master crime fighter known as The Black Bat. The stories were credited to the house name of G. Wayman Jones, but in actuality were written mainly by Norman A. Daniels. The Black Bat stories ran exclusively in the bi-monthly Black Book Detective magazine until it finally printed its last issue in the Winter of 1953. Black Book Detective returns in these vintage pulp tales, reissued for today’s readers in electronic format.
 
Table of Contents:
 
A Complete Book-Length Novel
The Seventh Column
Featuring Tony Quinn, Nemesis of Crime
by G. Wayman Jones
The Black Bat, masked foe of the underworld, plays a grim game of life and death to save America from treachery when he pits himself against the slimy hirelings of the Axis!
 
Other Gripping Stories
 
The Chinese Box
by C.K.M. Scanlon
A boastful crook’s clever scheme boomerangs
 
The Color of Murder
by Samuel J. Bailey
Young Larkin proves that he’s of true police mettle
 
Air Raid
by Ray Cummings
A screaming siren saves a man from murder
 
Off the Record — A Department
 
Radio Archives Pulp Classics line of eBooks are of the highest quality and feature the great Pulp Fiction stories of the 1930s-1950s. All eBooks produced by Radio Archives are available in ePub and Mobi formats for the ultimate in compatibility. If you have a Kindle, the Mobi version is what you want. If you have an iPad/iPhone, Android, or Nook, then the ePub version is what you want.
 
Radio Archives Pulp Classics
Planet Stories eBook
January 1952
 
Total Pulp Experience. These exciting pulp adventures have been beautifully reformatted for easy reading as an eBook and features every story, every editorial, and every column of the original pulp magazine.
 
During the science-fiction boom of the 1930s, there were over a dozen pulp magazines dedicated to the subject. Analog, Startling Stories, Amazing Stories, Wonder Stories, Captain Future and Super Science Stories were just a few. In 1939, the pulp magazine publisher of Jungle Stories, and many others, added its own entry into the sci-fi field, Planet Stories. Until it folded in 1955, it published ground-breaking science fiction from some of the genre's brightest stars, including such luminaries as Ray Cummings, Frederic Arnold Kummer, Jr., Eando Binder, Leight Bracket, Isaac Asimov, Clifford D. Simak, Henry Kuttner, Ray Bradbury, Frederik Pohl, James Blish, A.E. van Vogt, Theodore Sturgeon, Alan E. Nourse and Robert Sheckley. Planet Stories returns in these vintage pulp tales, reissued for today’s readers in electronic format.
 
Table of Contents:
 
Novel of Strange Worlds
Sargasso Of Lost Starships
by Paul Anderson
Far out in limitless space she plied her deadly trade... a Lorelei of the void, beckoning spacemen to death and destruction with her beautiful siren lure.
 
Novelet of Lost Races
Calling World-4 Of Kithgol
by H.B. Fyfe
Accidentally, the primitive Yorgh sent whirling off into space a grim, 200-year-old message... and lived to see his dead world meet the vibrant future.
 
The Android Kill — Short Story
by John Jakes
Someone, somewhere, made the androids too perfect. And Caffrey laughed out loud at the tremendous irony of the joke as he blasted his ship into the burning maw of the sun.
 
A Fine Day For Dying — Short Story
by John Martin
Fool, thou art, Condemeign, to even think of outwitting Nepenthe, Inc., dealers in beautiful, quiescent death.
 
The Vanderlark — Short Story
by M. St. Clair
No one, ever before, had tested the Hyras’ behavior in deep space. But McFeen was a deliberately crazy pioneer.
 
Last Call — Short Story
by Bryce Walton
Bronson was one of those rare beings who had heard THE CALL from Mars. But who can trust a chap who makes such a claim?
 
IT — Short Story
by Hayden Howard
Slowly, inexorably, the struggling Earthman was metamorphosed into a Siamese twin — a twin whose partner was jellied death.
 
The Dancers — Short Story
by Wilton Hazzard
Now there was time... plenty of time on this strange, dark planet... for those erudite exiles from frozen Earth to ponder the value of man’s accumulated knowledge.
 
The Vizigraph — Department
Get into the bout of ballots, blasts and battles.

Radio Archives Pulp Classics line of eBooks are of the highest quality and feature the great Pulp Fiction stories of the 1930s-1950s. All eBooks produced by Radio Archives are available in ePub and Mobi formats for the ultimate in compatibility. If you have a Kindle, the Mobi version is what you want. If you have an iPad/iPhone, Android, or Nook, then the ePub version is what you want.
 
 

 Bargain Basement
 
A large assortment of our most popular Old Time Radio sets are in the Bargain Basement!
 

Comments From Our Customers!
 
Michael Klein writes:
Thank the stars for Radio Archives! These books are greatly entertaining, and I’ve become hooked on them! I do hope more of these marvelous pulp adventures become available. I’ve read the entire Secret Agent X ebooks here and would especially love seeing more of him here!
 
Jan Willis writes:
In Gunsmoke, you are showcasing the greatest dramatic series in radio history and with the sound quality it deserves!
 
If you'd like to share a comment with us or if you have a question or a suggestion send an email to Service@RadioArchives.com. We'd love to hear from you!
 

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