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Radio Archives Newsletter
 
January 21, 2022
 
Six new products from Radio Archives in this newsletter!
All new Digital Download products are discounted 50% for the first two weeks.
 
Old Time Radio
Volume 25
 
Audio Clip
 
“I am the Whistler and I know many things, for I walk by night. I know many strange tales hidden in the hearts of men and women who have stepped into the shadows. Yes, I know the nameless terrors of which they dare not speak!”
 
Described by many as an anthology program, and others as a horror or mystery show, The Whistler indeed was all these things. In many ways, however, the program was first and foremost a crime show. What made it stand out from other programs of the same type was the use of the show’s namesake, the unseen, almost never participating observer with the eerie laugh and often chilling platitudes to share each week. The Whistler was not the first host of this type, being predated by The Shadow by almost a decade, and with others, such as The Mysterious Traveler, to follow. The Whistler definitely left his mark as one of the most memorable.
 
In the early episodes of The Whistler, the omniscient narrator with the creepy laugh would actually sometimes interact without actually participating in the stories. Writer-Producer J. Donald Wilson would at times have The Whistler act as the conscience of an episode’s protagonist, debating what the lead character should do next and usually pushing him or her to the deadliest decision. Then The Whistler would tell the listeners how the story played out. In 1944, this changed when George Allen became producer-director. The Whistler no longer played anyone’s conscience and the ending of each episode was fully played out, not summarized.
 
This shift in storytelling made The Whistler a more compelling, stronger program. With The Whistler simply as an omniscient observer, the tension was heightened, keeping listeners engaged right up to the often unexpected ending.
 
Follow The Whistler into the dark recesses of the human spirit in this thrilling collection from Radio Archives. The Whistler, Volume 25 features twelve broadcasts restored to sparkling digital quality.
 
6 hours
 
 
Audiobooks
Volume 5 Tales of Cape Noir
by Fred Adams Jr., Andy Fix, Drew Meyer, and Ron Fortier
Read by Roger Price
 
 
The Battle For Cape Noire
 
Cape Noire is a bustling, commercial seaport on the northwest coast. It is also an urban jungle where over a million souls reside. Among these are monsters both human and supernatural. Keeping them in check is the white skull masked Brother Bones, the Undead Avenger. In this new collection of tales, writers Fred Adams Jr., Andy Fix and Drew Meyer join creator Ron Fortier in presenting the next chapter in Hell’s own backyard.
 
Dr. Bugosi, the Mad Scientist of Cape Noire is dead and Harry Beest, the gorilla mobster, is assailed on all fronts as he tries to salvage the dead man’s journals. Meanwhile the sexy vampire, Sister Blood encounters a creature descended of island magic while trying to save a friend. At the same time Lt. Dan Rains hunts a kidnapped girl amidst a bloody gang war that threatens to flood the streets in blood.
 
Here is a mash-up of action, adventure and horror as only the saga of Brother Bones can provide. “Tales of Cape Noire” is a quartet of fevered nightmares you will not soon forget.
 
8 hours
 
 
 
 
Audiobooks
 
Radio Archives Pulp Classics
 
Total Pulp Experience. These exciting pulp adventures have been beautifully reformatted for easy reading as an eBook and features every story, every editorial, and every column of the original pulp magazine.
 
Explore the amazing worlds of tomorrow with Dynatmic Science Fiction! This pulp magazine published its first issue with December 1952, when the science fiction boom was nearing its peak. It came from a small publishing company, Columbia Publications, in Massachussets. Columbia Publications started producing pulp magazines in 1934 with the debut of Double Action Western Magazine and continued publishing a wide variety of magazines, detective, romance, western, sports, air adventure and mystery. Unfortunately Dynamic Science Fiction failed to find an audience and only six issues were published in its entirety. The sixth and final issue was the January 1954 issue. During that unfortunately short run, some of science-fiction's biggest names appeard in the magazine. Lester del Rey, Alfred Coppel, Poul Anderson, Arthur C. Clarke, James Blish, and others appeared in its pages. Dynamic Science Fiction returns in vintage pulp tales, reissued for today’s readers in electronic format.
 
 
 
Radio Archives Pulp Classics
 
Total Pulp Experience. These exciting pulp adventures have been beautifully reformatted for easy reading as an eBook and features every story, every editorial, and every column of the original pulp magazine.
 
Crack Detective Stories was a magazine that underwent multiple name changes... eight of them! During the middle of its run, it was known as Crack Detective Stories, but it didn't start out that way. Detective Yarns, as it was first known, made its debut with the June 1938 issue, coming from Columbia Publications. It switched to a character pulp, featuring The Black Hood as of September 1941, and its name changed to Black Hood Detective. Then it became Hooded Detective for two issues until Crack Detective was born in May of 1942. After ten issues a single word was added to the name, and it became Crack Detective Stories. With the November 1949 issue the title was changed to Famous Detective, and then after three issues it became Famous Detective Stories. The final incarnation began in December 1956 with the name Crack Detective and Mystery Stories. This title lasted for four issues. The final issue was July 1957, outlasting most of the other pulp magazines on the market. There were 97 issues published in all. Crack Detective Stories returns in these vintage pulp tales, reissued for today’s readers in electronic format.
 
 
Radio Archives Pulp Classics
 
Total Pulp Experience. These exciting pulp adventures have been beautifully reformatted for easy reading as an eBook and features every story, every editorial, and every column of the original pulp magazine.
 
Avast, me hearties! High-Seas Adventures was a short-lived magazine of only four issues, but for that brief time, it truly lived up to its name. Each issue was filled with adventure stories to make any land-lubber long for the excitement of the seven seas... the tang of the salt air... the roll of the deck... the shrill cries of seagulls as you near port. Its first issue was dated December 1934, and it came from Adventure Publications, one of Hugo Gernsback's magazines. After the fourth issue in June of 1935, the magazine combined with Pirate Stories, a similarly themed magazine from the same publisher, for two more issues... the final one being August 1935. High-Seas Adventures returns in these vintage pulp tales, reissued for today’s readers in electronic format.
 
 
Radio Archives Pulp Classics
 
Total Pulp Experience. These exciting pulp adventures have been beautifully reformatted for easy reading as an eBook and features every story, every editorial, and every column of the original pulp magazine.
 
During the science-fiction boom of the 1930s, there were over a dozen pulp magazines dedicated to the subject. Analog, Startling Stories, Amazing Stories, Wonder Stories, Captain Future and Super Science Stories were just a few. In 1939, the pulp magazine publisher of Jungle Stories, and many others, added its own entry into the sci-fi field, Planet Stories. Until it folded in 1955, it published ground-breaking science fiction from some of the genre's brightest stars, including such luminaries as Ray Cummings, Frederic Arnold Kummer, Jr., Eando Binder, Leight Bracket, Isaac Asimov, Clifford D. Simak, Henry Kuttner, Ray Bradbury, Frederik Pohl, James Blish, A.E. van Vogt, Theodore Sturgeon, Alan E. Nourse and Robert Sheckley. Planet Stories returns in these vintage pulp tales, reissued for today’s readers in electronic format.
 

Radio Archives Pulp Classics line of eBooks are of the highest quality and feature the great Pulp Fiction stories of the 1930s-1950s. All eBooks produced by Radio Archives are available in ePub and Mobi formats for the ultimate in compatibility. If you have a Kindle, the Mobi version is what you want. If you have an iPad/iPhone, Android, or Nook, then the ePub version is what you want.
 

 Bargain Basement
 
Check out all the bargains in the Bargain Basement!
 

Comments From Our Customers!
 
Abram Taylor writes:
Inner Sanctum Mysteries. These two Radio Archives collections were my first step through the creaking door---and, if you've never listened to an episode of this legendary OTR series, they should be yours, too. These sets are affordable, well-organized and, as with all Radio Archives releases, *very* nicely restored.
 
David Fricke from Thailand writes:
I truly enjoy the high quality of your radio dramas and I have been an avid fan of these classics for many years now.
 
If you'd like to share a comment with us or if you have a question or a suggestion send an email to Service@RadioArchives.com. We'd love to hear from you!
 

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The Radio Archives Newsletter is emailed every other Friday morning and features all the NEW products released by Radio Archives! The products in this newsletter are just a small fraction of what you'll find waiting for you at RadioArchives.com. Whether it's the sparkling audio fidelity of our classic radio collections, or the excitement of our pulp audiobooks and pulp eBooks, you'll find two thousand intriguing products at RadioArchives.com.
 
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