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Radio Archives Newsletter
 
June 21, 2019
 
New products from Radio Archives this week!
All new products created by Radio Archives are discounted 50% the first week.
 
Old Time Radio
Volume 2
 
 
The late forties and early fifties saw an increasing demand for syndicated radio drama. With the Federal Communications Commission having imposed a freeze on the issuance of new television licenses, radio remained the major source of entertainment across small-town America well into the early 1950s, and local stations displayed an insatiable appetite for programming to make up for revenues lost by cuts in network compensation to affiliates. Producers of recorded programming therefore found it difficult to keep up with the demand for new series.
 
Hollywood was quick to take note of this thriving market, and an increasing number of name stars realized that there was fast, easy money to be made in syndicated radio. This led to a barrage of new series built around marketable celebrities - series such as that spotlighted in this ten hour collection, Frontier Town.
 
Recorded in Hollywood in 1952-53 and distributed by Broadcast Producers Syndicate, Frontier Town features up-and-coming action star Jeff Chandler in a role far removed from his best-known radio role as Mr. Boynton, the goofy biology teacher boyfriend of Eve Arden on Our Miss Brooks. Credited as “Tex” rather than “Jeff,” Chandler is heard here as Chad Remington, a tough-but-dedicated lawyer in the rough and tumble frontier town of Dos Rios. Chandler filled the lead role for twenty-three episodes before being replaced for the remainder of the series by veteran movie tough guy Reed Hadley. Remington fights for justice with the aid of his windbag snake-oil selling sidekick Cherokee O’Bannon, portrayed in a voice redolent of W. C. Fields by character comedian Wade Crosby. The series was written and directed by Paul Franklin, taking a break from his usual role as a top radio comedy writer, and features original organ music by Ivan Ditmars and Bob Mitchell, with Bill Forman announcing.
 
10 hours - $14.99 Download / $29.98 Audio CDs
 
Discounted 50% the first week.
MP3 digital download - $7.49
Audio CDs - $14.99
 
 
75th Anniversary

 
 
It was the largest, most ambitious, and most successful military operation ever attempted -- and radio was there to cover it.

D-Day, the invasion of Normandy. It was the turning point of the war in Europe, the beginning of the end for the Axis as the Allies started their drive towards Germany. It was a momentous event that would change not only the course of World War II, but the history of the world. Radio Archives is pleased and proud to offer the complete and continuous CBS network coverage of the events of June 6 and 7, 1944.
 
Hear President Roosevelt, the BBC feed of Communique #1, General Eisenhower from SHAEF headquarters, King George VI speaking from London via the BBC. Bill Henry in Washington interviews Congressmen Moss, McCormick, Rogers, Voorhees, Mundt, Herbert, and Gore.
 
Regular CBS shows were included in the broadcast, “The Passing Parade”, “Columbia Presents Corwin”, “Burns & Allen”, “1st show of “The Doctor Fights”, “Perry Mason”, “Valiant Lady,” “Light of the World,” “The Open Door,” “Bachelor’s Children”, “Kate Smith Speaks”, “Big Sister”, “The Romance of Helen Trent”, “Life Can Be Beautiful”, “Ma Perkins”, “The Goldbergs” among them.
 
Hear the events of the day as reported by Irwin Darlington, Robert Trout, Maj. George Fielding Elliott, Ned Calmer, Quentin Reynolds, Alan Jackson, Merrill Mueller, Douglas Edwards, Quincy Howe, William Shirer, John Daly, and Edwin C. Hill with “The Human Side of the News”. Reporting from London are Edward R. Murrow, Wright Bryan, John W. Vandercook, David Anderson, Arthur Mann, and Charles Shaw reports from the BBC in London.
 
Herbert Clark reports from the invasion fleet off the coast of England, an eyewitness account of the first parachute drop, James Willard from SHAEF headquarters in London describes the invasion fleet from the air. Richard C. Hottelet describes the invasion from a plane over the beaches, French Colonel Morrison who describes the area of the invasion landings, Stanley Richardson eyewitness account of the invasion fleet, Charles Collingwood aboard an LST in the invasion fleet, and George Hicks from the invasion fleet, describing the shore bombardment before the landing.
 
These are recordings that many historians believe to be among the most valuable audio documents ever preserved. The CBS broadcasts — containing 34 hours of continuous programming of news, music, drama, comedy, and entertainment — are history as it happened, in a special collection that is sure to occupy a special place in your radio collection.
 
34 hours - $50.99 Download / $101.98 Audio CDs
 
Discounted 50% during May and June.
MP3 digital download - $25.49
Audio CDs - $50.99
 
 
75th Anniversary

 
 
It was the largest, most ambitious, and most successful military operation ever attempted -- and radio was there to cover it.

D-Day, the invasion of Normandy. It was the turning point of the war in Europe, the beginning of the end for the Axis as the Allies started their drive towards Germany. It was a momentous event that would change not only the course of World War II, but the history of the world. Radio Archives is pleased and proud to offer the complete and continuous NBC network coverage of the events of June 6 and 7, 1944.
 
Noted inspirational author Dr. Norman Vincent Peale, King Haakon VII of Norway, Premier Gerbandy of the Netherlands, Premier Pierlot of Belgium, and US Senators Clark, Barkley, White, Hill and Congresswoman Clare Boothe Luce speak, as does the President of the United States, Franklin Delano Roosevelt. General Eisenhower speaks from SHAEF headquarters.
 
Regular NBC shows were included in the broadcast, “The Bob Hope Show”, “Fibber McGee & Molly”, “The Guiding Light”, “Vic & Sade”, “The Red Skelton Show”, “The Road of Life”, “Today’s Children”, “Ma Perkins”, “Pepper Young’s Family”, “Mary Noble, Backstage Wife”, “Stella Dallas”, “Lorenzo Jones”, “Young Widder Brown”, “When A Girl Marries” and “Front Page Farrell” among them.
 
Hear the events of the day as reported by Ben Grauer, Cesar Saerchinger, Charles F. McCarthy, David Anderson, Don Goddard, Don Hollenbeck, Ed Hocker, Edward R. Murrow, Elmer Peterson, George Wheeler, H. V. Kaltenborn, Herbert M. Clark, James Willard, John W. Vandercook, Louis P. Lockner, Lowell Thomas, Merrill Mueller, Morgan Beatty, Ralph Howard, Richard Harkness, Robert McCormick, Robert St. John, Tommy Traynor, W. W. Chaplin and Wright Bryan. Alex Dreier, in Chicago, recalled his experiences as the last western correspondent in Nazi Germany while Stanley Richardson offered an eyewitness account of the invasion from the Channel boats, and George Hicks reported from the beach-head itself!

These are recordings that many historians believe to be among the most valuable audio documents ever preserved. The NBC broadcasts — containing over 38 hours of continuous programming of news, music, drama, comedy, and entertainment — are history as it happened, in a special collection that is sure to occupy a special place in your radio collection.
 
38 hours - $56.99 Download / $113.98 Audio CDs
 
Discounted 50% during May and June.
MP3 digital download - $28.49
Audio CDs - $56.99
 
 
On June 6, 2004, in remembrance of the 60th anniversary of the Normandy invasion, the ABC Radio program Perspective featured a fascinating story detailing radio's coverage of D-Day as it happened in 1944. Written, edited, and narrated by ABC reporter Chuck Sivertsen, the feature utilized clips from the D-Day collection described above. We think this in-depth and well-presented piece provides an excellent overview of the historic content of this collection.
 
 
Audiobooks
The Sky Serpent Flies Again!
by Robert J. Hogan
Read by Nick Santa Maria
 
 
They called G-8 the Flying Spy. History never recorded his exploits—and for good reason! No one would ever believe World War I was that wild!
 
The sharpened claws of a Yellow Ace are red with the blood of Americans, and only G-8 and his Battle Aces remain in the path of the Sky Serpent! Men die like flies beneath the onslaught of his oriental curse, and only G-8 stands between this fiend and the salvation of a million men! G-8 and his Battle Aces fly and fight along the bloody trail of the Sky Serpent!
 
G-8 and His Battle Aces proved popular almost immediately upon its debut in October 1933. The magazine hit the stands at the height of the Aviation Pulp craze. Millions of readers, especially young fans, dreamed of donning pilot goggles and climbing into flying machines. And Author Robert J. Hogan made sure his readers had plenty to enjoy. For a period during the 110 issue run of the magazine, it was believed Hogan was writing more than two million words a year for Pulp magazines, more than any other Pulp writer ever.
 
Another reason for G-8’s success had to do with the fantastical, weird menace like setting of the tales. Readers just didn’t want flying stories; they were particularly interested in tales from the last Great War. There was something that, for a brief time, captured the imagination of readers about pilots during World War One. But, with this obviously being something that would end as quickly as it started, Popular Publications allowed Hogan to up the ante even more.
 
G-8 changed the face of Aviation Pulp forever. Hogan not only put him in the fictional skies, but he also created spectacular, even supernatural enemies for the Battle Aces to protect the world from.
 
Nick Santa Maria brings G-8, Nippy and Bull to thrilling life in their desperate struggle to defeat a nemesis unlike anything they have ever before encountered in The Sky Serpent Flies Again. Originally published in the February, 1939 issue of G-8 and His Battle Aces magazine.
 
Nick DeGregorio composed the music for the G-8 and His Battle Aces series of audiobooks.
 
5 hours - $9.99 Download / $19.98 Audio CDs
 
Discounted 50% the first week.
MP3 digital download - $4.99
Audio CDs - $9.99
 
 
#47 Corpse Cavalry of the Yellow Vulture
by Curtis Steele
Read by Milton Bagby
 
 
Company after company, Operator #5 hurled his gallant volunteers against the Asiatic hordes in a desperate attempt to draw off the enemy siege of the east. For that ruthless tyrant, called the Yellow Vulture, had a stranglehold on America’s eastern seaboard, and silent factories and idle shipping testified to the doom of a once great country. Yet when the sons of Liberty at last arose to throw off the conqueror’s yoke, they were met by the most terrible calamity in history — an incredible Japanese weapon which plunged America in complete midnight darkness and butchered her patriots in a fiend-made night of hell!
 
James Christopher did not technically belong to the U. S. Secret Service. He was a top agent for an America’s unnamed Intelligence Service. It was in his blood. His father, John Christopher, retired from the same agency years before. Carrying a letter from the President of the United States identifying him as Operator #5, Jimmy Christopher played for keeps. He carried a rapier sewn into his belt, and in a golden skull hanging from his watch-chain was a reservoir of poison to be taken in the event of capture.
 
Working for Agent Z-7, head of an unnamed branch of U. S. Intelligence in the decade before the C. I. A. was ever envisioned, Operator #5 was assisted by newspaper reporter Diane Elliott, a two-fisted street kid named Tim Donovan, as well as his twin sister, Nan Christopher. Jimmy’s father, a retired operative himself, often backed him up with sound advice on the fine art of counter-espionage.
 
With his sturdy band of volunteer patriots, Operator #5 makes a final effort to draw off the Asiatic hordes from their attack upon the eastern seaboard — and put an end to the strange new Japanese war-weapon which has shrouded America in midnight darkness!
 
Corpse Cavalry of the Yellow Vulture is read with stirring intensity by Milton Bagby. Originally published in the September-October 1939 issue of Operator #5 magazine.
 
5 hours - $9.99 Download / $19.98 Audio CDs
 
Discounted 50% the first week.
MP3 digital download - $4.99
Audio CDs - $9.99
 
 
by Ron Fortier
Read by Nick Santa Maria
 
 
Americans have always had a fascination for flying ever since the Wright Brothers left the ground at Kitty Hawk. They captured the imagination of an entire country and it was a love affair that continued as the science of aviation progressed throughout the coming decades. By the time World War One arrived, the military had found a way to bring combat into the clouds and soon the exploits of such romantic figures as Baron Manfred von Richthofen, the Red Baron, were spreading around the globe.
 
As with all things, timing is everything, and the war’s ending happen to coincide with the heyday of the pulps. From the 1920s through the 1930s over two hundred magazines were published monthly for an eager audience of ten million readers. These tabloids were printed on cheap paper and explored every category known to fiction; from westerns to mysteries, pirate tales to romances. All produced to satisfy an insatiable appetite for escapist literature.
 
Naturally pulp publishers sought to exploit the rising interest in flying. Filmmaker Howard Hughes had wowed moviegoers with the 1927 release of Wings and later the 1930 Hell’s Angels, which employed more than a hundred pilots, dozens of aircrafts and made chivalrous heroes of World War One American air aces. Soon dozens of flying themed magazines were appearing on the newsstands. By the end of 1928 there were over forty monthlies labeled the “flying pulps.” Many of these were anthologies written by World War One veterans and included such titles as, Aces, Battle Birds, Wings, Flying Aces, War Aces etc. etc. As exciting as these were, they were never quite as popular as those titles that spotlighted fictional pilots.
 
Among the best of these Kerry Keene, the Griffon, a Department of Justice agent and the masked pilot of an amphibian plane which incorporated many futuristic elements for the time. Written by Arch Whitehouse, The Griffon’s exploits read pretty like an airborne masked avenger. While writer Donald Keyhoe whipped up two dashing heroes who took to the air to win the war in Europe. There was Captain Strange, an intelligence officer who possessed ESP and other truly weird mental abilities. Not to be outdone was Richard Knight, another gifted aviator who had the ability to see in the dark.
 
Author and veteran pilot, Robert J. Hogan gave us G-8, and then there was The Phantom Eagle, Dusty Ayers, and Bucky Barnes. The list goes on and on and over the years, many pulp historians have penned hundreds of essays detailing these great characters, their origins and their revered place in pulp history.
 
As for my introduction to the flying pulps, well that came by way of a comic book character called Baron Hans von Hammer, the Hammer of Hell. He was a German war ace clearly modeled after the Red Baron and created by writer Robert Kanigher and illustrated by Joe Kubert. His exploits first appeared in 1965 in Our Army at War as a back up featured called Enemy Ace. Like the Red Baron, Von Hammer flew a blood red Fokker Dr.1 triplane and his stories were anti-war fables. In them Von Hammer often referred to what he poetically called “the killer skies.” As much as I enjoyed these stories, it was Kubert’s agonizing beautiful illustrations of those classic planes that won me over. Through them I became fascinated with aviation history, especially that of the World War One period and began reading any and all books I could find on the subject.
 
When I eventually discovered American pulps, it is easy to see why I became instantly enamored of the flying titles. When artist Rob Davis and I launched Airship 27 Productions, we set about creating our own high-flying series such as Lance Star – Sky Ranger, Zeppelin Tales and the recently released Aviation Aces. Still, as much as those books did well for us, I was not content to merely sit on the sidelines as an editor. The itch to jump into the game and invent my own aviation hero was too strong to deny any longer.
 
This book is my personal tip of the wings to all those wonderful characters who came before and to hope that in some small way, Nighthawk will take his place among them. Thanks and welcome on board.
 
4 hours - $7.99 Download / $15.98 Audio CDs
 
Discounted 50% the first week.
MP3 digital download - $3.99
Audio CDs - $7.99
 
 
eBooks
Radio Archives Pulp Classics
Startling Stories eBook
September 1941
 
Total Pulp Experience. These exciting pulp adventures have been beautifully reformatted for easy reading as an eBook and features every story, every editorial, and every column of the original pulp magazine.
 
Startling Stories was the younger sibling of Thrilling Wonder Stories. It began in 1939 at the urging of science fiction fans who clamored for a full-length novel in each issue. At this point, Thrilling Wonder Stories contained a variety of novelets and short stories, but fans wanted something longer that allowed for more character development. And thus, Startling Stories was born. Each issue started off with a book-length novel, and was filled out with a variety of short stories, science columns, special features and, of course, letters to the editor. Some of science-fiction's best authors appeared in Startling Stories, including luminaries such as Stanley G. Weinbaum, Eando Binder, Edmond Hamilton, Alfred Bester and Robert Campbell, Jr. The magazine thrived through the 1940s and early 1950s, but fading revenues forced it to close with the Fall 1955 issue, after a 99-issue run. Startling Stories now returns with these vintage pulp tales, reissued for today’s readers in electronic format.
 
Table of Contents:
 

A Complete Book-Length Scientifiction Novel
The Bottom Of The World
by John Coleman Burroughs And Hulbert Burroughs
Countless thousands vanish when a weird kidnaper snatches west coast cities off the map! Follow Dan Norris as he invades a fantastic realm far below the earth.

Prisoners In Flatland — Unusual Story
by Frank Belknap Long
A mighty drama of human struggle is played out in the asteroid belt

Death From The Stars — Unusual Story
by A. Rowley Hilliard
An outstanding Scientifiction Hall of Fame selection

No Heroes Wanted — Unusual Story
by Robert Moore Williams
Red Riley makes history when a spaceship tests him!

Thrills In Science — Thumbnail Sketches

Science Question Box — Answers To Queries

The Ether Vibrates — Announcements And Letters

Review Of Science Fiction Fan Publications
by The Editor

 
Radio Archives Pulp Classics line of eBooks are of the highest quality and feature the great Pulp Fiction stories of the 1930s-1950s. All eBooks produced by Radio Archives are available in ePub and Mobi formats for the ultimate in compatibility. If you have a Kindle, the Mobi version is what you want. If you have an iPad/iPhone, Android, or Nook, then the ePub version is what you want. $3.99
 
Discounted 50% the first week.
$1.99
 
 
 
Radio Archives Pulp Classics
Captain Danger #15 Spring 1944
 
Total Pulp Experience. These exciting pulp adventures have been beautifully reformatted for easy reading as an eBook and features every story, every editorial, and every column of the original pulp magazine.
 
Winging from World War II skies, it's Captain Danger, Nazi-dom’s ultimate nemesis! The exploits of this steely-eyed defender of justice, this whirlwind ace of aces, were things of legend as he struggled against the Axis of Evil. Captain Allan Danger, a character of epic proportions, first appeared in Air War, a new aviation magazine from Thrilling Publications in 1940. Intended as a companion magazine to Sky Fighters and The Lone Eagle, Air War contained a variety of aviation war stories, each showcasing an adventure of Captain Danger.
 
Captain Danger typified a hard-jawed, larger-than-life ace pilot who would battle the Nazi threat, encountering fantastic situations, robot-controlled planes, death fogs, and Nazi bombers that had harnessed the power of splitting the atom. In all, fifteen adventures of Captain Danger were published between 1940 and 1944, as the flyboys of the Allied nations battled against the war power of the Axis. The stories were part of America’s propaganda machine, blatant and unapologetic, high on hyperbole, low on subtlety. The Axis was portrayed as sniveling cowards who would shoot down helpless parachuters and run from an even fight —the Allies as staunch, dauntless, fighting for right. And greatest of them all... Captain Danger! Air War returns in vintage pulp tales, reissued for today’s readers in electronic format.
 
Table of Contents:
 

Featured Complete Novelet

The Catapult Plane

by Robert Sidney Bowen

Scoffing at death, Perry Austin consecrates himself to the most daring plan of vengeance ever attempted by a pilot!

 

Another Exciting Complete Novelet

East Of Chungking

by David Goodis

When Baxter had to battle against odds over China with a U.S. Bombsight at stake, he proved he still had what it took!

 

Will You Drive A Little Slower? — Swift-Action Short Story

by John X. Brown

Lieutenant Commander Evans gives a hero a lift!

 

Captain Danger’s Special Mission — Swift-Action Short Story

by Lieut. Scott Morgan

An intrepid flyer wings across the Adriatic to rescue a Jugoslav patriot.

 

Aces Always Get Back — Swift-Action Short Story

by Jay Michel Berlove

When forgetful Corporal Regan gets a big chance, his memory plays another trick.

 

Headache For Hirohito — Swift-Action Short Story

by Stuart Campbell

A Jap sub gives Joe Berry and Bert Dolan an unexpected opportunity.

 

Here Are Your Wings! — Special Feature

by Sam Merwin, Jr.

How to get ready to join our mightiest Axis-busting team.

 

The Rear Seat Men — Special Feature

by Keith Ayling

When it comes to training aerial gunners, Uncle Sam is tops.

 

The Worst Weather In The World — Special Feature

by Brig. Gen. William E. Lynd

Operating a tactical Air Force in fog-shrouded skies over Kiska.

 

Prop Wash — Special Feature

by Joe Archibald

A live-wire department for our readers.

 

Off The Runway — A Department

An interesting batch of current aviation news and notes.

 
Radio Archives Pulp Classics line of eBooks are of the highest quality and feature the great Pulp Fiction stories of the 1930s-1950s. All eBooks produced by Radio Archives are available in ePub and Mobi formats for the ultimate in compatibility. If you have a Kindle, the Mobi version is what you want. If you have an iPad/iPhone, Android, or Nook, then the ePub version is what you want. $3.99
 
Discounted 50% the first week.
$1.99
 
 

 Bargain Basement
 
Audiobooks, Books, Double Novel Pulp Reprints, and Old Time Radio Cassettes, Reels and Audio CD sets are all in the Bargain Basement.
 
Two Old Time Radio sets and two Pulp Audiobooks at a 50% discount are in the Bargain Basement each newsletter.
 
Large reel to reel collection of 50,000 shows is being sold, 100 reels at a time in the Bargain Basement.
 

Comments From Our Customers!
 
Archie Hunter writes:
Would you please set aside Treasures Vol 54 for me. Thanks. I am currently listening to Vol 53 and I am enjoying it immensely.
 
Blaine Toman draws:
 
If you'd like to share a comment with us or if you have a question or a suggestion send an email to Service@RadioArchives.com. We'd love to hear from you!

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The Radio Archives Newsletter is emailed every Friday morning and features all the NEW products released by Radio Archives this week! The products in this newsletter are just a small fraction of what you'll find waiting for you at RadioArchives.com. Whether it's the sparkling audio fidelity of our classic radio collections, or the excitement of our pulp audiobooks and pulp eBooks, you'll find fifteen hundred intriguing items at RadioArchives.com.
 
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