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Dime Mystery Magazine eBook James A Goldthwaite Book 2 - [Download] #RE488
Dime Mystery Magazine eBook James A Goldthwaite Book 2
 

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Description
 
Radio Archives Pulp Classics
Dime Mystery Magazine eBook
James A Goldthwaite Book 2
 
These exciting pulp adventures have been beautifully reformatted for easy reading as an eBook. As a special bonus, Will Murray has written an introduction especially for this Dime Mystery Magazine series of eBooks.
 
In 1934 a new type of magazine was born. Known by various names — the shudder pulps, mystery-terror magazines, horror-terror magazines — weird menace is the sub-genre term that has survived today. Dime Mystery Magazine was one of the most popular. It came from Popular Publications, whose publisher Harry Steeger was inspired by the Grand Guignol theater of Paris. This breed of pulp story survived less than ten years, but in that time, they became infamous, even to this day. This ebook contains a collection of stories from the pages of Dime Mystery Magazine, all written by James A Goldthwaite, reissued for today’s readers in electronic format.
 
Table of Contents:
 
Dime Mystery Magazine — An Introduction
by Will Murray
 
Prince of the Black Fire — January 1937 issue of Dime Mystery Magazine
by James A. Goldthwaite writing as Francis James
The harsh, weird voice of the hornbill croaked the coming of the black fire to the helpless body of the girl whom I adored, it was the dreadful harbinger of the invisible, torturing flame a human monster summoned from the depths of hell to be the instrument of his deathless hatred!
 
The Beauty Shop Horrors — March 1937 issue of Dime Mystery Magazine
by James A. Goldthwaite writing as Francis James
They were drawn to that dreadful shop as moths are drawn to the destroying flame — those young girls whose beauty was their fatal curse — to be led through the red halls of madness to the ultimate blackness of shameful death!
 
Slaves of the Midnight Caverns — July 1937 issue of Dime Mystery Magazine
by James A. Goldthwaite writing as Francis James
Was it into the hands of beings beyond the ken of any mortal that those lost miners, those terror-haunted girls had fallen – to be tossed up, when dreadful lusts had been appeased, as pitiable, broken corpses?
 
The Blood Vendor — November 1937 issue of Dime Mystery Magazine
by James A. Goldthwaite writing as Francis James
Ill with revulsion, Claire and I stared at another of those nude, horribly clawed girlish figures that were daily being found in the dismal woodside — and we thought at once of the obscene light of youth we had seen in the eyes of the hideous old men from David Holmes’ mission...
 
Merry Christmas from the Dead! — December 1937 issue of Dime Mystery Magazine
by James A. Goldthwaite writing as Francis James
It turned out to be a gruesome party, which Marcia and John attended that fateful Christmas Eve. For each guest received as a present his own death notice — from the hand of a corpse!
 
Arms of the Flame Goddess — April 1938 issue of Dime Mystery Magazine
by James A. Goldthwaite writing as Francis James
The shadow of the Penitentes — that strange and terrible cult of fire-worshipers — filled my heart with dread. For I knew that soon the lovely body of my wife would be a scorched and blackened sacrifice to their devils of desire.
 
Radio Archives Pulp Classics line of eBooks are of the highest quality and feature the great Pulp Fiction stories of the 1930s-1950s. All eBooks produced by Radio Archives are available in ePub and Mobi formats for the ultimate in compatibility. If you have a Kindle, the Mobi version is what you want. If you have an iPad/iPhone, Android, or Nook, then the ePub version is what you want.

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