Old Time RadioAudiobookseBooksPulp Fiction Books
Newsletter
eMail
Call

(Your shopping cart is empty)

 

  Claudia, Volume 1 - 10 hours [Audio CDs] #RA059



 
Alternative Views:


10 hours - Audio CD Set


Our Price: $29.98

Availability: Usually Ships in 24 Hours
Product Code: RA059
Qty:

Description
 

Claudia
Volume 1



Actress Dorothy McGuire played Claudia on Broadway and in two popular films for 20th Century-Fox.In "Soapland," his five-part New Yorker overview of daytime serial programs first published in 1948, writer James Thurber probably best defined the successful radio soap opera. He wrote:

"A soap opera is a kind of sandwich, whose recipe is simple enough... Between thick slices of advertising, spread twelve minutes of dialogue, add predicament, villainy, and female suffering in equal measure, throw in a dash of nobility, sprinkle with tears, season with organ music, cover with a rich announcer sauce, and serve five times a week. It is the hope of every advertiser to habituate the housewife to an engrossing narrative whose optimum length is forever and at the same time to saturate the consciousness with the miracle of a given product, so that she will be aware of it all the days of her life and mutter its name in her sleep."

Coca-Cola was the sponsor of "Claudia" and, as with most of the programs they presented, the broadcasts featured their familiar theme music, "The Coca-Cola Waltz."Thurber was, of course, writing about mainstream daytime programs - shows which had been filling the airwaves since the early 1930s and, by 1948, had become a major profit center for radio networks, advertisers, production companies, and the actors and actresses who frequently subsidized their theatrical careers by appearing on anywhere from one to ten soaps a week. By 1941, sixty-five daily quarter-hour programs could be heard on network radio, reaching an estimated audience of some twenty million -- with some scheduled together in blocks of as many as sixteen soaps in a row.

For the most part, their content was predictable, but deeply engrossing. Aimed straight at the mind and pocketbook of the stay-at-home housewife stuck with the daily drudgery of raising a family and taking care of a home, soap operas played on the apparent human need for intrigue, insider knowledge, gossip, and the satisfaction that comes from knowing that, no matter how tedious or dull or awful your life is, someone out there has it much worse than you do. (In broadcasting, this need reached its peak - or its nadir, depending upon your point of view - in such latter-day television free-for-all's as "The Jerry Springer Show," where each day nearly every viewer could feel superior to at least one of the low-end guests.) In their hey-day, radio soap operas reflected a daily mix of strum und drang that always walked a fine line between vague plausibility and chew-the-scenery, over-the-top melodrama. On a typical day in Soapland, for instance, "Stella Dallas" could be heard commandeering a submarine in order to rescue her kidnapped daughter Lollie-Baby from the clutches of a lustful sheik while, on "Rosemary," the story of young Rosemary Dawson's "struggle to find happiness as the wife of a returned war veteran" afflicted with frequent bouts of amnesia, the heroine's husband is getting along well with his wife and family until he hears Rosemary sing "Night and Day" and, out of the blue, suddenly remembers that he has a former wife as well as a daughter. On "Young Doctor Malone," Dr. Jerry Malone is being tried for a murder he didn't commit, while also suffering from a case of hysterical paralysis and simultaneously dealing with frequent attacks of amnesia. (Thurber nominated Malone for a "True Christian Martyr Award" and also noted that, in Soapland, amnesia "strikes almost as often...as the common cold in our world. There have been as many as eight or nine amnesia cases on the air at any one time.")

But, in 1947, a new soap opera debuted that was far different - far more quiet and gentle and down-to-earth - than its strife-ridden forbears.

"Claudia" told the tale of Claudia and David Naughton, newlyweds, just beginning their married life. Young, enthusiastic, and very much in love, they weren't suffering from any medical maladies or suspicions of infidelity. Instead, they were simply facing the many challenges of any new marriage - finding an apartment, getting used to each other's quirks, and learning to live together on a daily basis.

Lacking many of the characteristics of a traditional soap opera, "Claudia" didn't offer the anguish and heartbreak that typified such long-running soaps as "Valiant Lady," "Backstage Wife," and "Ma Perkins" - and, being sponsored by Coca-Cola, it even lacked the traditional sponsorship of a soap company. But the very elements it was lacking quickly became its strengths: with very few of the "tune in tomorrow" hooks that most soaps used to lure listeners back the next day, people returning to "Claudia" instead came back for the interesting, fully developed characters, the light-hearted banter between them, and the familiarity of their day-to-day situations. Rather than suffering with or feeling superior to them, the characters were, instead, simply the sort of people you enjoyed spending time with. Given this, it may be best to view "Claudia" as a continuing daytime drama, rather than as a soap opera -- and a fairly light drama, at that.

Unlike most "soap operas" which were aired live, "Claudia" was syndicated to local stations on 16" vinyl transcription recordings.Actress Dorothy McGuire impressed Broadway audiences with her portrayal of Claudia Naughton, a young and naive girl facing the challenges of marriage, in Rose Franken's "Claudia," which opened at New York's Booth Theater in February 1941. Two years later, she would star in the 20th Century Fox film version as well."Claudia" was based on the literary works of Rose Franken, a writer, novelist, playwright, and theatrical director who had first written about the Naughton's in the mid-1930s. By the end of the decade, the highly popular short stories had been brought together into a series of best-selling novels which, in 1941, were adapted by Franken into a Broadway play. "Claudia," which opened at the Booth Theater on February 12, 1941, starred Donald Cook as David and a young actress named Dorothy McGuire in the title role. Claudia Naughton was a breakout role for McGuire, whose previous stage experience had been understudying and playing small parts in touring companies. The sincerity, simplicity, and captivating charm which she brought to the part made the play a long-running hit and soon brought her to Hollywood to reprise the role in the 20th Century Fox film version, released in 1943 and co-starring Robert Young as David. Based on that film's success, in 1945, RKO Pictures starred McGuire and Young in "The Enchanted Cottage" and 1946 found them together again in "Claudia and David," a sequel to the earlier film.

Due in large part to the success of the two "Claudia" movies, in 1947, the D'Arcy advertising agency decided to bring the characters to radio in a five-a-week quarter-hour serial on behalf of its client, Coca-Cola. First heard on Monday, September 29, 1947. Kathryn Bard was cast as Claudia and Paul Crabtree as David, with Joe King announcing. As with most shows sponsored by Coke, the organ theme was the "Coca Cola Waltz," a tune very familiar to radio listeners thanks to Coke's earlier sponsorship of such popular shows as "The Victory Parade of Spotlight Bands," Spike Jones' "Spotlight Review," and "Songs by Morton Downey." But this daily serial was not the first time that "Claudia" had been heard on the air nor, in fact, would it be the last. In June of 1941, "Claudia" had appeared as a weekly skit on the "Kate Smith Hour," quickly transitioning into Smith's summer replacement series that same year. In 1952, after the radio serial had left the air, "Claudia" came to television in a half-hour series, seen in a short run on NBC from January through March and later switching to CBS until June.

Heard today, "Claudia" remains wonderful entertainment, notable for both its light-hearted tone and the believable interplay between its characters. Claudia, a bit younger than her years, is often impulsive, sometimes irresponsible, usually perky, and just a bit flighty. Her father had died when she was still a young girl and, as an only child, had been raised by her widowed mother. As a newlywed who married when she was just eighteen, she occasionally ponders whether she is still a "mama-baby," tied to her mother's apron strings and relying too much on Mama's continuing support and advice. As she matures, she becomes a unique mixture of enthusiasm, incompetence and over-confidence -- deeply in love with her somewhat older husband David but frequently naive and too likely to trust her insecurities rather than her instincts.

Claudia's loving and patient husband David came from a substantial family and he had trained to be an architect until World War II interrupted his plans. Like many a returning veteran, he's working to get ahead in his field, but he sometimes questions whether he's chosen the right career path - particularly when considering the success of his older brother Hartley, an influential banker. In the first forty episodes of "Claudia," heard here for the first time in sixty years, you'll listen in as Claudia and David spend the first days of their marriage living with Claudia's mother, then as they find their first apartment and move out on their own. You'll shed a tear as they remember the nation's sacrifices on Armistice Day. You'll laugh as David teaches Claudia to drive. You'll be there as Claudia learns to cook, as she adopts two kittens and as she learns to be a good wife to David. You'll meet Claudia's mother, Mrs. Brown, neighbor Bertha, building supervisor Fritz, David's co-worker Roger, and his brother Hartley. You'll get to know all these people and their share their lives for fifteen minutes each day. That's the way "Claudia" was originally intended to be heard -- and that's the way we recommend you enjoy it today.

One of the sad things about radio show preservation is the fact that so many long-running series exist today only in fragments - a broadcast here and a broadcast there, rather than long continuous runs of a particular program. This is particularly the case when it comes to soap operas, where it is difficult to get into a storyline when so few consecutive episodes exist. Happily, that is not the case with "Claudia"; Radio Archives has been able to locate and preserve the entire eighteen-month run of the series - 390 episodes in all - with no missing shows, allowing you to enjoy the complete series on a day-by-day basis. This collection offers the first 40 shows of "Claudia," with the remaining episodes to be issued in many upcoming volumes -- a real treasure for radio enthusiasts to enjoy for many years to come.


#1 Meet the Naughtons
Monday, September 29, 1947 - 15:00 - Syndicated, sponsored by Coca Cola

#2 Let Them Eat Cake
Tuesday, September 30, 1947 - 15:00 - Syndicated, sponsored by Coca Cola

#3 The Wedding Presents
Wednesday, October 1, 1947 - 15:00 - Syndicated, sponsored by Coca Cola

#4 Many Happy Returns
Thursday, October 2, 1947 - 15:00 - Syndicated, sponsored by Coca Cola

#5 The New Apartment
Friday, October 3, 1947 - 15:00 - Syndicated, sponsored by Coca Cola

#6 It's a Lock
Monday, October 6, 1947 - 15:00 - Syndicated, sponsored by Coca Cola

#7 Introspection
Tuesday, October 7, 1947 - 15:00 - Syndicated, sponsored by Coca Cola

#8 Mama's Early Birthday
Wednesday, October 8, 1947 - 15:00 - Syndicated, sponsored by Coca Cola

#9 Claudia Worries
Thursday, October 9, 1947 - 15:00 - Syndicated, sponsored by Coca Cola

#10 Moving Day
Friday, October 10, 1947 - 15:00 - Syndicated, sponsored by Coca Cola

#11 The First Quarrel
Monday, October 13, 1947 - 15:00 - Syndicated, sponsored by Coca Cola

#12 Dog Days
Tuesday, October 14, 1947 - 15:00 - Syndicated, sponsored by Coca Cola

#13 Life With Major
Wednesday, October 15, 1947 - 15:00 - Syndicated, sponsored by Coca Cola

#14 Salmon on Sale
Thursday, October 16, 1947 - 15:00 - Syndicated, sponsored by Coca Cola

#15 Dinner Plans
Friday, October 17, 1947 - 15:00 - Syndicated, sponsored by Coca Cola

#16 The Salmon Mousse
Monday, October 20, 1947 - 15:00 - Syndicated, sponsored by Coca Cola

#17 Return of the Wedding Presents
Tuesday, October 21, 1947 - 15:00 - Syndicated, sponsored by Coca Cola

#18 The Leaky Faucet
Wednesday, October 22, 1947 - 15:00 - Syndicated, sponsored by Coca Cola

#19 The Beginning of Our Home
Thursday, October 23, 1947 - 15:00 - Syndicated, sponsored by Coca Cola

#20 Family Finances
Friday, October 24, 1947 - 15:00 - Syndicated, sponsored by Coca Cola

#21 The New Car
Monday, October 27, 1947 - 15:00 - Syndicated, sponsored by Coca Cola

#22 The Driver's Test
Tuesday, October 28, 1947 - 15:00 - Syndicated, sponsored by Coca Cola

#23 The Trip
Wednesday, October 29, 1947 - 15:00 - Syndicated, sponsored by Coca Cola

#24 David's Shirt
Thursday, October 30, 1947 - 15:00 - Syndicated, sponsored by Coca Cola

#25 A Beautiful Sunday
Friday, October 31, 1947 - 15:00 - Syndicated, sponsored by Coca Cola

#26 Driving Downtown
Monday, November 3, 1947 - 15:00 - Syndicated, sponsored by Coca Cola

#27 Roger's Visit
Tuesday, November 4, 1947 - 15:00 - Syndicated, sponsored by Coca Cola

#28 The Broken Mandarin
Wednesday, November 5, 1947 - 15:00 - Syndicated, sponsored by Coca Cola

#29 The Engagement Ring
Thursday, November 6, 1947 - 15:00 - Syndicated, sponsored by Coca Cola

#30 Mama is Ill
Friday, November 7, 1947 - 15:00 - Syndicated, sponsored by Coca Cola

#31 David's Cold
Monday, November 10, 1947 - 15:00 - Syndicated, sponsored by Coca Cola

#32 Armistice Day
Tuesday, November 11, 1947 - 15:00 - Syndicated, sponsored by Coca Cola

#33 The Kittens
Wednesday, November 12, 1947 - 15:00 - Syndicated, sponsored by Coca Cola

#34 A Sick Kitten
Thursday, November 13, 1947 - 15:00 - Syndicated, sponsored by Coca Cola

#35 Stolen Car
Friday, November 14, 1947 - 15:00 - Syndicated, sponsored by Coca Cola

#36 A Small Death
Monday, November 17, 1947 - 15:00 - Syndicated, sponsored by Coca Cola

#37 Hartley and Julia Return
Tuesday, November 18, 1947 - 15:00 - Syndicated, sponsored by Coca Cola

#38 Opera Tickets
Wednesday, November 19, 1947 - 15:00 - Syndicated, sponsored by Coca Cola

#39 A Night at the Opera
Thursday, November 20, 1947 - 15:00 - Syndicated, sponsored by Coca Cola

#40 An Available Apartment
Friday, November 21, 1947 - 15:00 - Syndicated, sponsored by Coca Cola



Average Customer Review: 5 of 5 | Total Reviews: 10 Write a review

  0 of 0 people found the following review helpful:
 
Family-type Program March 3, 2013
Reviewer: David Dymond from Tulsa, OK United States  
Claudia and her mother were fairly good, but I didn't care too much for the husband--he sounded much older. Pretty tame show, compared to nowadays!

Was this review helpful to you?

  0 of 0 people found the following review helpful:
 
Charming and Addictive September 18, 2009
Reviewer: Donald Urbancic  
Although not a fan of soap operas, I purchased "Claudia" and "One Man's Family" with doubts that I would ever listen to them. Kermyt Anderson's letter enticed me to check out "Claudia" and sure enough, it is charming and addictive. Many thanks for this and for your commitment to preservation!

Was this review helpful to you?

  0 of 0 people found the following review helpful:
 
What a Thoughtful, Gentle, and Loving Soap Opera September 18, 2009
Reviewer: Greg Adams  
Recently, I purchased "Claudia," Volume 1. I'm almost finished listening to it. (One cannot and should not try and listen to all of the episodes in one or two sittings.) All I can say is, what a thoughtful, loving and gentle soap opera that was and is. Thanks so much for restoring it and making it available to us. Please don't keep me waiting for too long for volume 2 and the others to follow!

Was this review helpful to you?

  0 of 0 people found the following review helpful:
 
Thank You for This Wonderful Show September 18, 2009
Reviewer: John Leasure  
Thank you for this wonderful show. This is the kind of show radio did so well -- a small cast telling small stories.

Was this review helpful to you?

  0 of 0 people found the following review helpful:
 
I Loved the Claudia Shows September 18, 2009
Reviewer: John Payne  
I loved the "Claudia" shows and look forward to the next volume.

Was this review helpful to you?

View All Customer Reviews
RadioArchives.com

 About Us
 Privacy Policy
 Send Us Feedback