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  Doc Savage Volume 15 [Pulp Reprint] #5041



 
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Doc Savage
Volume 15

The 75th birthday of the pulp era's greatest superhero is commemorated with a unique triple-novel edition. In
"Terror Wears No Shoes," Doc Savage journeys to Hong Kong to prevent a deadly germ warfare attack against the United States. Then, the Man of Bronze penetrates the Iron Curtain in "The Red Spider," a Cold War thriller that was "lost" until 1978, showcasing for the first time the unpublished art Edd Cartier created for the story in 1948. Finally, a scientist is able to predict the future after his "Return from Cormoral." This collector's item pulp reprint features the cover painting by Bob Larkin from the first Bantam Books reprint, interior illustrations by Edd Cartier and Paul Orban, and historical articles by Will Murray.


Art Sippo Reviews "The Red Spider"
Review written and copyrighted by Dr. Art Sippo; used with permission

The Red Spider is an authentic lost Doc Savage novel that had not been printed in any magazine. It was rediscovered by Will Murray in the late 1970s among Lester Dent's papers. The original title was "In Hell, Madonna" which was a quote from Shakespeare's Twelfth Night, Scene Five: "I think his soul is in Hell, madonna."
 
It is 1949, and the world is buzzing with this question: "Do the Russians have the atomic bomb?" Doc Savage is sent on a secret mission to the heart of the Soviet Union to discover the answer. He is flown in by a supersonic aircraft and does a high altitude parachute jump into the heart of Mother Russia. Monk Mayfair and Ham Brooks are already there under deep cover. The plan is to infiltrate the heart of the Kremlin and discover the truth.
 
Doc and his aides must make their way through hostile territory where the secret police hold the populace in thrall and everyone is considered a spy until proven innocent. The Bronze man battles with both his wits and fists to carry out his mission.
 
During this adventure he meets a host of intriguing characters: Zardnov, the Russian spymaster, Seryi Mitroff, a beautiful female Russian agent whom Doc Savage starts to fall for, the mysterious Frunzoff who holds all of Russia's secrets and Josef Stalin, the mad dictator of the Soviet Union whom Doc Savage confronts face to face. This is a cold war spy novel that presaged the work of Ian Fleming, John le Carre, and Len Deighton.


Art Sippo Reviews "Doc Savage, Supreme Adventurer"
Review written and copyrighted by Dr. Art Sippo; used with permission

In December, 1932 Lester Dent was assigned the job of writing the first story for the planned Doc Savage Magazine. To assist him, the magazine’s editor, John Nanovic, wrote a brief story showcasing the Doc Savage character and his five associates. It was entitled Doc Savage, Supreme Adventurer. Doc and his five men travel to Central America and find a lost tribe of Indians who possess a massive treasure in God. Doc’s father had arranged for this to be his son’s legacy. But corrupt government officials in the Central American country want to hijack the treasure for themselves. They already killed the elder Savage and now they are trying to kill Doc.

The portrait of Doc and his aides in this story is not quite what we have come to know through the Classic pulp series. Dent recast the characters and rewrote the story to give us the initial Doc Savage saga “The Man of Bronze.” Along the way he crafted a cast of unforgettable characters upon whom he had left his own literary stamp.

But the story “Doc Savage, Supreme Adventurer” is the first Doc Savage story ever written and is of significant importance in the origin and development of the series. As a bonus, this story contains the complete text of the letter Clark Savage Sr. had written to his son which was only quoted in part in “The Man of Bronze.” Every true Doc Savage fan needs to read this story. We are indebted to Anthony Tollin and Will Murray for including it in their reprint series.


Art Sippo discovered Doc Savage in 1965 from the Bantam reprint of "The Land of Terror" given to him by his Aunt Helen who read them as a nurse during World War II. He was hooked and continued to collect the reprints until Bantam completed the series in 1990. Doc Savage became the inspiration for Art's career in medicine and he earned his Masters In Public Health from Johns Hopkins specifically because that was Doc's alma mater. Art is board certified in Aerospace medicine and Occupational Medicine. He served for 36 years in uniform including 14 years in the reserves, 12 years as a flight surgeon and medical researcher on active duty in the US Army, and 10 years in the Ohio Army National Guard as a hospital commander and assistant state surgeon. He currently works as a Emergency Room Physician and Medical Consultant in southern Illinois. Art has written several short stories and articles on Doc Savage that have been published in magazines and books. His lovely wife Kathy is his muse and his editor.


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